Together again for the first time in Giant-Size Invaders 1, at auction

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The Multiverse was tricky business before it even really existed. Marvel Slowly Brought Its Golden Age Characters Back After The Debut Fantastic Four #1 launched the Marvel Universe for the Silver Age. Captain America was unfrozen, lamenting a death that never happened for his sidekick Bucky, and ultimately, tales of suspense borrowed elements from some of his Golden Age adventures and retold them as historical tales from World War II to the Silver Age. The submarine was awakened from amnesia to find that Atlantis had been destroyed by underwater atomic testing (which often happened to Atlantis in the comics). And sure enough, the Human Torch returned to both his body (as a vision) and his mind (as a member of the Fantastic Four). Naturally, these reintroductions created contradictions. Unfortunately, Captain America and the submarine didn’t recognize each other when Cap debuted in Avengers #4, for example. While DC Comics ultimately tried to explain the differences between its Golden and Silver Ages with the concept of multiple Earths, Marvel had mostly just ignored its own set of those differences, preferring to refer to its stories from Golden Age comics in a very broad way. – until Giant Size Invaders #1. There’s a copy of this fascinating moment in Marvel history with Giant Size Invaders #1 (Marvel, 1975) CGC NM+ 9.6 White Pages auctioned in the May 1-2, 2022 Sunday and Monday Comic Books Select Auction #122218 heritage auctions.

Giant Size Invaders #1 (Marvel, 1975)

While the appearance of Golden Age versions of Captain America, Sub-Mariner and Human Torch in Avengers #71 is often called the first appearance of the invaders, the connection is indirect and the team there is not called the invaders. This World War II time travel adventure is set five years before Giant Size Invaders #1 (which debuted before the Invaders series itself), it does not include the entire Invaders team, and due to its 1941 time frame, this saga creates more continuity issues than it solves. . While they clearly live in the same world (and of course there are crossovers), the main heroes of Marvel’s Golden Age didn’t really form a team until after the end of World War II. world (All-Winners Comics #19, Fall 1946) – although Bucky and Toro were both part of the Young Allies. In a sense, one could say that Giant Size Invaders #1 tries to solve the problem set up in Avengers #71. To do this, he began creating specific callbacks to Golden Age comic book stories.

Giant Size Invaders #1 reprints a story of Submarine #1 and references Young Allies #1. In an editorial in this issue, Roy Thomas explains how this will work, “While, as explained in the Invaders story, this issue’s Sub-Mariner reprint actually happened, more or less, we generally won’t consider ourselves bound by everything that happened in old Timely magazines unless we also verify it in the tales of the Invaders themselves.”

To emphasize the fact that these heroes were a real team before the fall of 1946 according to this “new” Marvel canon, Giant Size Invaders #1the cover of is a tribute to Comic All-Winners #4. This title’s covers regularly featured Marvel’s big-name heroes, despite the fact that the interior comics themselves featured them in separate stories before. All-Winners Comic #19. Overall, Invaders is probably underrated for what it attempted to do, and even thinking about it now makes me wish it ended up being a more comprehensive effort. There’s a copy of this fascinating moment in Marvel history in Giant Size Invaders #1 (Marvel, 1975) CGC NM+ 9.6 White Pages auctioned in the May 1-2, 2022 Sunday and Monday Comic Books Select Auction #122218 heritage auctions.

Sponsored by Heritage
Posted in: Comics, Sponsored by Heritage, Vintage Paper | Tagged: bronze age, captain america, human torch, invaders, marvel, submariner

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